Harvey Weinstein: 'Beautiful Girls' Scribe Scott Rosenberg

Re: 'Beautiful Girls' Scribe Scott Rosenberg On a Complicate

Postby admin » Tue Oct 31, 2017 9:49 pm

Men who’ve lost jobs or face sexual harassment claims since Harvey Weinstein scandal
by David Carrig
USA TODAY
Oct. 31, 2017

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A national uproar has erupted after revelations of years of sexual abuse by powerful Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein. It has prompted more women to go public with their experiences of men exploiting positions of power, and some men are being held accountable.

Here is a list of powerful men who have either lost their jobs or have been accused of harassment or sexual misconduct since the Weinstein scandal broke:

Mark Halperin

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NBC News senior political analyst Mark Halperin has apologized for what he terms "inappropriate" behavior after five women claimed he sexually harassed them while he was a top ABC News executive.
(Photo: Richard Shotwell, Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP)


• Work: NBC News, MSNBC political analyst; formerly with ABC News
• Accusation: Five women say he sexually harassed them, including forcibly kissing and grabbing the breasts of one woman
• Consequences: NBC News terminated its contract with Halperin, according to several reports. Halperin also lost a book deal and an HBO project based on it after the allegations.
• Halperin said in a statement to CNN: "I now understand from these accounts that my behavior was inappropriate and caused others pain. For that, I am deeply sorry and I apologize. Under the circumstances, I'm going to take a step back from my day-to-day work while I properly deal with this situation."

John Besh

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Chef John Besh attends the Supper to benefit the Global Fund to fight AIDS in New York. Besh is stepping down from the restaurant group that bears his name after a newspaper reported that 25 current or former employees of the business said they were victims of sexual harassment. (Photo: Brad Barket/Invision/AP)

• Work: Celebrity chef; co-owner of Besh Restaurant Group, which includes New Orleans restaurants such as August, Domenica and Willa Jean.
• Accusation: 25 women have made allegations against Besh and other male co-workers that they were sexually harassed while working for the restaurant group, according to a report by The Times-Picayune and NOLA.com. The women described “a corporate culture where sexual harassment flourished” and where “male co-workers and bosses touched female employees without consent, made suggestive comments about their appearance and – in a few cases – tried to leverage positions of authority for sex,” the report said.
• Consequences: Besh stepped down from Besh Restaurant Group on Oct. 23.
• Besh said: "I have been seeking to rebuild my marriage and come to terms with my reckless actions," he wrote in a statement. "I also regret any harm this may have caused to my second family at the restaurant group, and sincerely apologize to anyone past and present who has worked for me who found my behavior as unacceptable as I do."

Robert Scoble

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The sexual harassment dominoes continue to fall as more women go public with allegations of men exploiting positions of power. USA TODAY

• Work: Public speaker and blogger, technology consultant and expert in augmented and virtual reality
• Accusation: Two women have accused Scoble of sexual harassment and a third said he verbally harassed her. In an interview with USA TODAY earlier in October after the allegations came to light, Scoble apologized for his behavior: "I did some things that are really, really hurtful to the women and I feel ashamed by that," Scoble said. "I have taken many steps to try to get better.”
• Consequences: Resigned from his business consulting firm Transformation Group on Oct. 22. His former business partner said he would refrain from public speaking engagements through the end of the year.
Scoble now denies sexual misconduct charges: In a blog post on Oct. 25, Scoble defended himself against the allegations and says he's not guilty of sexual harassment because he had no power to "make or break" the careers of women who made allegations against him. “Sexual Harassment requires that I have such power,” he wrote.

James Toback

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Add another name to the list of powerful men being accused of sexual harassment in Hollywood. Reported by the Los Angeles Times, Oscar-nominated writer and film director, James Toback has been accused of sexual harassment by more than 30 women. USA TODAY

• Work: Film writer and director
• Accusation: 38 women accused Toback of sexual harassment, according to a report in the Los Angeles Times. More than 270 additional women came forward with similar claims after the report. Actress Selma Blair said he requested she read a monologue naked, asked her to have sex with him and after refusing pleasured himself. Rachel McAdams and Julianne Moore also detailed incidents with Toback.
• Toback’s response: The director denied the charges to the Times. “In earlier reports, he denied previous allegations and said he had never met the women or, if he did, it "was for five minutes and have no recollection," the Times reported.


Roy Price

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In August, producer Isa Hackett accused Amazon Studios chief Roy Price of making unwanted sexual remarks. It wasn't until after the Weinstein scandal broke that Price was forced out of his high-profile job. (Photo: Barry Brecheisen, AP)

• Work: Amazon Studios programming chief
• Accusation: Isa Hackett, a producer of Amazon Studios' series The Man in the High Castle, accused Price of insistently and repeatedly propositioning her in 2015, including telling her that she would "love my d***, The Information reported. Hackett said she told Amazon about the issues at the time.
• Consequences: Price resigned on Oct. 17, five days after being placed on suspension over the allegations of sexual harassment. Two of Price’s lieutenants, Joe Lewis and Conrad Riggs, were also let go shortly after his departure.
• Price’s last Facebook post on Oct. 17 said: Left job at Amazon.com

Terry Richardson

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Fashion photographer Terry Richardson has been banned from working with major magazines over sexual misconduct allegations dating back to 2010. USA TODAY

• Work: Fashion photographer known for his sexually explicit aesthetic
• Accusations: Multiple allegations have been made against Richardson since 2010 when some models began going public, describing episodes of graphic abuse, inappropriate touching and sexual harassment during photo shoots.
• Consequences: Condé Nast International discontinued working with Richardson Oct. 24 and banned him from future assignments.
• A representative for Richardson sent a statement to BuzzFeed News, saying: “He is an artist who has been known for his sexually explicit work so many of his professional interactions with subjects were sexual and explicit in nature but all of the subjects of his work participated consensually.

Leon Wieseltier

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One-time New Republic literary editor Leon Wieseltier apologized to past staffers for behavior that accusers say included inappropriate touching. The Emerson Collective immediately pulled its support for a magazine Wieseltier was set to publish. (Photo: June 9, 2013 photo by AP)

• Work: Former New Republic editor, senior fellow at The Brookings Institution
• Accusations: Former female employees at the New Republic began circulating stories about Wieseltier’s conduct after the Harvey Weinstein scandal broke, according to Politico, citing sources familiar with the private discussions. Wieseltier was also included on an anonymous list called ‘Sh**ty Media Men’ that detailed sexual misconduct.
• Consequences: Emerson Collective cut ties with Wieseltier and halted production of an upcoming literary journal he was set to oversee, according to Politico. The Brookings Institution suspended Wieseltier without pay, according to the Washington Post.
• Wieseltier said: “For my offenses against some of my colleagues in the past I offer a shaken apology and ask for their forgiveness,” Wieseltier said in a statement. “The women with whom I worked are smart and good people. I am ashamed to know that I made any of them feel demeaned and disrespected. I assure them that I will not waste this reckoning.”
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Re: 'Beautiful Girls' Scribe Scott Rosenberg On a Complicate

Postby admin » Tue Oct 31, 2017 10:11 pm

O’Reilly, "Shitty Media Men," and the Harassment Double Standard: In the past, the sexual-harasser perps got their jobs back while their female victims lost their careers. Will this time be different?
by Sarah Ellison
Vanity Fair
October 27, 2017 6:07 PM

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Photo of Anthony Weiner, Bill Clinton, Bill O'Reilly, and several other men accused of sexual harassment.
Photo Illustration by Vanity Fair; From right, by Craig Barritt/Getty Images, by Joe Raedle/Getty Images, by Diana Walker/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images, by Brooks Kraft LLC/Corbis/Getty Images, by Nathan Congleton/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank/Getty Images, by Paul Zimmerman/WireImage.


Ever since The New York Times and The New Yorker broke open the story of Harvey Weinstein’s predatory behavior and alleged serial sexual harassment, new instances of harassment have come to light in what feels like an unstoppable wave. And there’s an eery, Matrix-like feel to the revelations these past weeks. Many of the women I have spoken to in recent weeks say that it was the election of Donald Trump, just weeks after the Billy Bush tape, in which Trump bragged about assaulting women, was made public, that made them realize the country at large didn’t seem to care about women’s complaints of sexual harassment. That, coupled with the Roger Ailes scandal, primed the soil for the Weinstein scandal to grow as quickly and vigorously as it has.

In the short term, men of significant cultural clout are being sidelined, particularly in the media business. Fox News’s Bill O’Reilly, Amazon Studios’s Roy Price, Mark Halperin, Vox’s Lockhart Steele, and others have all had to step away from their jobs to work on or work out their “situation.” Halperin’s use of that term struck me as the ultimate of euphemisms. Indeed, after losing his HBO deal, his book deal, and being deleted from his speaking agency’s Web site, he is in something that definitely could be called a situation.

The sudden crashing of so many powerful males has convinced some that this is a sea change. However much these stories were covered up in the past, the rapidity with which they are coming out now is striking. And it is causing significant soul-searching, not just in the media world, but in Silicon Valley, Washington, and on Wall Street, where this kind of behavior has been out in the open for decades.

One measure by which to determine if this soul-searching will lead to lasting change concerns second chances and rehabilitation, and thus far the available evidence is not encouraging. Harvey Weinstein seems to have flunked out of sex rehab after about a week. Bill O’Reilly, who has been in extended conversations with the Sinclair Broadcast Group since losing his position at Fox News, is reportedly still having those conversations, despite the $32 million secret settlement that O’Reilly made after being accused, among other things, of having a “non-consensual sexual relationship” with a former colleague and sending her gay porn. (O’Reilly denied the allegations, quite angrily, to The New York Times, which broke the story.) “They took a pause, but it didn’t really change anything for them,” a source told NBC News of Sinclair’s discussions with O’Reilly.

Roger Ailes passed away this summer, so it’s fair to assume that he will not have a second act. But what happens to Roy Price, Mark Halperin, Lockhart Steele, Leon Wieseltier, and the other men who have been accused of sexual harassment remains to be seen. (Wieseltier was among several dozen men named in the infamous “Shitty Media Men” list, an unverified, crowdsourced spreadsheet that circulated online earlier this month.) Anthony Weiner, who, after apologizing for his inappropriate messages to women, came back to run for mayor of New York (only to be caught doing the same thing again, and again) provided a lesson to men that apology and shamelessness in the wake of sexual scandal can pave a path back to an old life. Before him, there was Bill Clinton. Our current president has simply done away with the apology part of the equation and gone straight for shamelessness to recover after the Billy Bush tape and after nearly 20 women accused him of groping and other sexual misconduct during the campaign. After all, if we live in the attention economy, where simply capturing the news cycle is reward enough, then moving on has its benefits.

Meanwhile, the inequity between the fortunes of these men and their victims is staggering. What we know is that there are fewer second chances for the women who come forward to allege sexual harassment. Many of the women who spoke out against Ailes, notably Gretchen Carlson, are no longer working in television news. When I interviewed Carlson at Fortune’s Most Powerful Women Summit earlier this month, I asked her if she felt she had been retaliated against in the industry for coming forward. She told me that she has been holding down five jobs since she left Fox News (with a $20 million settlement), including writing a book and launching her own not-for-profit to train women about how to handle sexual harassment at work. A TV job, however, hasn't happened yet. “Gretchen has received many opportunities and inquiries to get back into TV," said her publicist, Cindi Berger, "but has not entertained any as of yet except for one project she’s currently working on with an iconic Hollywood producer which will be announced soon. After her book tour and Ted Talk she will be taking television meetings for her return to the career she built for 25 years.”

One person told me that Carlson’s situation is not unlike Colin Kaepernick’s, where the person who launched the movement is the one who ends up paying the price, even as those who come after benefit from the initial courage of that individual. Some of the other women who came out against Ailes and O’Reilly and do not currently have contracts in television news include Julie Roginsky, Juliet Huddy, Andrea Mackris, Rebecca Gomez Diamond, and Andrea Tantaros, among others. One high-profile anchor, Megyn Kelly, who alleged that Ailes harassed her over 10 years ago, bucked the trend, and has managed to land at the Today show, where she currently hosts her own 9 a.m. hour of that franchise. (That may have something to do with Kelly’s long delay before reporting her alleged harassment. Even then, her former colleague O’Reilly lashed out at her for “making my network look bad,” a comment that spurred Kelly to make a renewed complaint to her bosses about O’Reilly’s behavior.) I’ve spoken to six other women, who wish to remain anonymous, about their difficulty finding jobs after complaining of sexual harassment.

These are stories not of harassment that happened in the 1990s, but, in some cases, harassment that happened in the 16 months since Carlson sued Roger Ailes. Many more women still working in their chosen professions can relate to Charlotte Observer beat reporter Jourdan Rodrigue, who asked Cam Newton a question during a news conference and was dismissed by Newton as “funny” because she was a woman talking about the physicality of the game. Rodrigue later tweeted that the situation got “worse” when she confronted Newton after his news conference. He apologized later in a video message to anyone who was offended by his comments, noting, as is custom, that he has daughters.

One can go back in recent memory to Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, who faced allegations of sexual harassment in the early 1990s from his secretary Anita Hill, to find a man accused of sexual harassment who ended up not simply surviving allegations of sexual harassment, but thriving in his career. If this is truly a watershed moment, we’ll be able to witness the same kind of comeback stories for the brave women who are coming forward now. Finally, the victims will have second chances, too.

This article has been updated to clarify Carlson's TV prospects since her departure from Fox.
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Re: 'Beautiful Girls' Scribe Scott Rosenberg On a Complicate

Postby admin » Tue Oct 31, 2017 10:25 pm

Lena Dunham, Amber Tamblyn, Rose McGowan React to Shocking Harvey Weinstein Report
by Rebecca Rubin @rebeccaarubin
October 5, 2017

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On Thursday, a bombshell investigation in the New York Times cited decades-spanning sexual harassment allegations against producer Harvey Weinstein, and celebrities were quick to react to the shocking report.

Lena Dunham was among the first to respond, and commended the individuals who came forward. “The woman who chose to speak about their experience of harassment by Harvey Weinstein deserve our awe,” she wrote on Twitter. “It’s not fun or easy. It’s brave.”

Lena Dunham ✔@lenadunham
The woman who chose to speak about their experience of harassment by Harvey Weinstein deserve our awe. It's not fun or easy. It's brave.
11:51 AM - Oct 5, 2017


Amber Tamblyn, who recently spoke out about her own experiences with sexual harassment, said, “Heed the mantra and never forget: Women. Have. Nothing. To. Gain. And. Everything. To Lose. By. Coming. forward.”

Amber Tamblyn ✔@ambertamblyn
Heed the mantra and never forget: Women. Have. Nothing. To. Gain. And. Everything. To Lose. By. Coming. forward. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/05/us/h ... tions.html
11:50 AM - Oct 5, 2017
Harvey Weinstein Paid Off Sexual Harassment Accusers for Decades
An investigation by The New York Times found allegations stretching back to 1990 about Mr. Weinstein’s treatment of women in Hollywood.
nytimes.com


The Times article revealed actress Rose McGowan reached $100,000 settlement Weinstein in 1997. She responded on Twitter saying, “Women fight on. And to the men out there, stand up. We need you as allies.”

rose mcgowan ✔@rosemcgowan
Women fight on. And to the men out there, stand up. We need you as allies. #bebrave
12:29 PM - Oct 5, 2017


A number of journalists put the spotlight on male-dominated cultures in the workplace. “Every industry has at least one of these powerful creeps. Look around. Do you know who the Weinstein is?,” Ann Friedman asked, while TV writer Anne Donahue shared a story of her own. “I’ll go first: I was a 17-yr-old co-op student and he insisted on massaging my shoulders as I typed,” she wrote.

ann friedman @annfriedman
Every industry has at least one of these powerful creeps. Look around. Do you know who the Weinstein is?https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/05/us/harvey-weinstein-harassment-allegations.html …
11:29 AM - Oct 5, 2017
Harvey Weinstein Paid Off Sexual Harassment Accusers for Decades
An investigation by The New York Times found allegations stretching back to 1990 about Mr. Weinstein’s treatment of women in Hollywood.
nytimes.com


Anne T. Donahue ✔@annetdonahue
When did you meet YOUR Harvey Weinstein? I'll go first: I was a 17-yr-old co-op student and he insisted on massaging my shoulders as I typed
11:51 AM - Oct 5, 2017


Alyssa Rosenberg ✔@AlyssaRosenberg
Harvey Weinstein is merely the latest of many, many, many reminders that Hollywood isn't actually a progressive industry.
11:23 AM - Oct 5, 2017


The reporters who worked on the Harvey Weinstein story are heroes. Women who had the courage to speak out are heroes. Huge thanks to all.

— Tomris Laffly (@TomiLaffly) October 5, 2017


Women were not alone in speaking out against Weinstein. Film producer Keith Calder wrote, “Just flipped through some contracts to make sure I’m legally allowed to say Harvey Weinstein is the worst person in the film business.”

Keith Calder ✔@keithcalder
Just flipped through some contracts to make sure I'm legally allowed to say Harvey Weinstein is the worst person in the film business.
11:46 AM - Oct 5, 2017


“This Harvey Weinstein story is stomach-turning. As is the thought of how many people enabled this behavior,” journalist and author Mark Harris wrote.

Mark Harris ✔@MarkHarrisNYC
This Harvey Weinstein story is stomach-turning. As is the thought of how many people enabled this behavior.
11:56 AM - Oct 5, 2017
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Re: 'Beautiful Girls' Scribe Scott Rosenberg On a Complicate

Postby admin » Tue Oct 31, 2017 10:29 pm

The ‘Shitty Media Men’ list? We’re asking all the wrong questions about it
by Helen Gould
the guardian.com
October 18, 2017

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Last week, amid the clamour of yet another high-profile man being accused of sexual abuse (and another industry exposed as complicit), a controversial document was shared.

The spreadsheet, titled “SHITTY MEDIA MEN”, gathered a list of names: the names of men who were alleged to have done everything from inappropriate flirting to physical violence.

The claims were unsubstantiated and the file has since been made private; but why does such a list exist, and why would someone share it?

First, it is crucial to acknowledge that sexual harassment, assault, and rape are absolutely everywhere. The media is not alone in this issue, nor is Hollywood. It is in politics, businesses, schools, and families; it is even in supposedly radical left spaces.

As with so many other things, just because you can’t see it doesn’t mean it’s not happening. The nature of abuse often requires that it is hidden from others to maintain plausible deniability, making it impossible to tell who is an abuser until they abuse you.

To put it simply, it is most likely that this spreadsheet was made in the interests of safety.


These types of list are hidden, but they exist everywhere. However, they are normally not written down and shared through a Google doc; instead, they are passed on through word of mouth or private social media groups or chats.

There are many reasons why employees don’t use the formal process to report inappropriate behaviour in the workplace, even if they are lucky enough to be working in an organisation with a functional HR department. Fear of reprisal, of not being believed, of “overreacting”, of nothing happening at all – these are all sadly valid concerns. This is especially true when the abuser is more senior. And as harassment and assault so often take place in private, the evidence that is usually required for a complaint to be taken to disciplinary is just not there.

But lack of evidence does not mean the same thing as innocence; and contrary to the beliefs of a sizeable minority, people do not usually fabricate accusations like these. It is highly improbable that this was done out of spite or to harm anyone’s career, and given that anyone could add to it anonymously, there is no financial or social gain to be made.


So. If someone is assaulted in their workplace – or anywhere – what can they do when they know that the processes they are supposed to follow don’t work? They make their own.

Instead of wondering why so many names were added to such a list, concern turns to the careers of the men named


This usually means people who have been victimised passing a warning on to others who might be put in the same position. A whisper network develops which tells you how to protect yourself and who from. When a new person who could be vulnerable joins the community, they are quietly informed of the issue as well. This advice can include everything from avoiding after-work drinks with the person to only communicating via email to not being in one-to-one meetings with them.

This spreadsheet was a similar informal safety measure that was created because nothing else was working. The difference is that it was loud about it. It had much the same effect as a person standing up in an office and shouting “X, Y, and Z are abusive!”

But instead of wondering why so many names were added to such a list and what could be done about it, concern turns to the careers of the men named (whether guilty or not) and accusations of vigilantism. However, on the whole, men – and it is usually men – who behave terribly often do not experience severe consequences for it. For instance, many celebrities have hit the headlines with hideous assault allegations only to walk away without many serious repercussions.

This is not just because they are celebrities; it is because abusers in general benefit from rape culture, which prioritises blaming the victim rather than finding justice. So if your name was on the list, but you are in fact innocent, there is likely not much to worry about. The way the system works tends to be far worse for the person making the accusation.


What this list changed was the power dynamics, which most corporate structures do not really take into account – generally because the imbalance of power suits them just fine. When I work as a facilitator, I always pay attention to the power dynamics expressed through who is speaking and who is not; who gets interrupted; who gets dismissed.

This spreadsheet attempted to take control of the narrative by speaking out and rebalancing the power differential that has led to such an ingrained culture of silence; it refused to be dismissed and could not be interrupted. That is part of what made it uncomfortable reading.

Of course it raised all kinds of moral and legal questions; but the impulse behind it is entirely understandable. It should make us consider how to make our communities safer and destroy the culture that leads to people getting away with abuse.


That work starts with dismantling the power imbalances of sexism, racism, homophobia, ableism, and many more forms of oppression that are inherent in western society and which protect abusers. It starts with listening when people start to shout, as they did with this document. It should have started centuries ago; but the next best time is now.

Helen Gould is a writer, speaker and facilitator
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Re: 'Beautiful Girls' Scribe Scott Rosenberg On a Complicate

Postby admin » Tue Oct 31, 2017 11:04 pm

Harvey Weinstein Says Brother Bob Responsible for His Demise
tmz.com
10/10/2017 5:36 PM PDT

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Image

12:35 PM PT -- A rep for Harvey tells us, "No matter what derogatory things Bob Weinstein says about his brother, Harvey Weinstein believes his brother is his brother and does not believe his brother would leak his personnel file to the NYT." The rep continues, "Harvey is dealing with his family and is currently in counseling. These are his priorities."

Harvey Weinstein believes his own brother was responsible for his demise, and he has the proof in the form of a receipt ... but Bob Weinstein says Harvey's a "very sick man" who's slinging fake stories to deflect from his own misdeeds.

Sources connected to H.W. tell TMZ, Harvey firmly believes it was his brother Bob who fed The New York Times the information for its sexual harassment story. He believes it was a well-orchestrated plan by Bob to remove Harvey from the company he built.

Weinstein, we're told, firmly believes the entire board knew about his sexual harassment troubles for years. Our sources say 7 months ago Bob received Weinstein's entire personnel file which detailed a number of the claims, and he believes Bob leaked the file to The NY Times.

As for proof the file was sent, we're told Harvey Weinstein's people have a FedEx receipt which shows his brother got the material.

Image

Bob Weinstein came out swinging, telling TMZ, "My brother Harvey is obviously a very sick man. I've urged him to seek immediate professional help because he is in dire need of it. His remorse and apologies to the victims of his abuse are hollow. He said he would go away for help and has yet to do so."

Bob goes on ... "He has proven himself to be a world class liar and now rather than seeking help he is looking to blame others. His assertion is categorically untrue from A to Z. I pray he gets the help that he needs and I believe that it is him behind all of these stories to distract from his own failure to get help."
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Re: 'Beautiful Girls' Scribe Scott Rosenberg On a Complicate

Postby admin » Tue Oct 31, 2017 11:14 pm

Bob Weinstein says 'sick and depraved' brother Harvey Weinstein abused him
by Joi-Marie McKenzie
ABC News
October 14, 2017, 1:34 PM ET

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Bob Weinstein is opening up amid the scandal over sexual misconduct allegations against his brother, claiming he was a victim of abuse by Harvey Weinstein.

"I was also the object of a lot of his verbal abuse — at one time physical abuse," the co-chairman of The Weinstein Co. told The Hollywood Reporter in a wide-ranging interview.

"And I am not looking for one bit of sympathy from anyone," the younger brother of Harvey Weinstein added. "I do not put myself in the category at all of those women that he hurt. But it's a complicated situation when it's your brother doing the abusing to you as well. I saw it and I asked him to get help for many years. And that's the truth. He avoided getting the help. We begged him."


Harvey Weinstein, 65, has been accused of sexual misconduct by numerous women, including actresses Ashley Judd, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Angelina Jolie. He was fired Sunday night by the board of the company he and Bob Weinstein founded in 2005.

Since the scandal broke, The Weinstein Co. has been under increased scrutiny and is expected to undergo a name change, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Bob Weinstein, 62, said that he's barely spoken to his brother in the past five years. He emphasized that he was not aware of his brother's alleged sexual misconduct but instead thought Harvey Weinstein was engaged in adultery with one woman after another.

"I could not take his cheating," he said, referring to Harvey Weinstein's marriage to wife Georgina Chapman, "his lying and also his attitude toward everyone."


With the allegations now made against Harvey Weinstein, Bob Weinstein said, "My brother has caused unconscionable suffering ... I want him to get the justice that he deserves."

The Weinstein Co. fired Harvey Weinstein on Sunday night, and four board members have stepped down in the wake of the scandal.

Bob Weinstein said the board wants to go further and "sever" Harvey Weinstein's ownership interest in the company. "It can't be done that quickly," he said.

Earlier, in a statement Friday, Bob Weinstein told ABC News that the studio will survive the scandal.

"Our banks, partners and shareholders are fully supportive of our company and it is untrue that the company or board is exploring a sale or shutdown of the company," Weinstein said. "Business is continuing as usual as the company moves ahead."

A spokesperson for Harvey Weinstein told The New Yorker: "Any allegations of non-consensual sex are unequivocally denied by Mr. Weinstein."

"Mr. Weinstein has further confirmed that there were never any acts of retaliation against any women for refusing his advances. Mr. Weinstein obviously can’t speak to anonymous allegations, but with respect to any women who have made allegations on the record, Mr. Weinstein believes that all of these relationships were consensual," according to the full statement from Weinstein's spokesperson. "Mr. Weinstein has begun counseling, has listened to the community and is pursuing a better path. Mr. Weinstein is hoping that, if he makes enough progress, he will be given a second chance.”
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Re: 'Beautiful Girls' Scribe Scott Rosenberg On a Complicate

Postby admin » Tue Oct 31, 2017 11:24 pm

Emma Thompson: 'Harvey Weinstein's no sex addict. He is a predator': Actor says there are many men in Hollywood like the film mogul who has been accused of multiple sexual assaults
by Patrick Greenfield and Lisa O'Carroll
theguardian.com
Friday 13 October 2017 08.54 EDT
First published on Thursday 12 October 2017 17.47 EDT

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Oscar-winning actor Emma Thompson has branded Harvey Weinstein a bully and a predator and said the scandal now engulfing the Hollywood mogul had echoes of Jimmy Savile.

In a frank interview on BBC2’s Newsnight, the star of Nanny McPhee and Love Actually said the casting couch culture exposed in the past week was endemic and part of a systemic “public health” gender crisis that was endangering girls and women.

“One of the big problems in the system we have is that there are so many blind eyes and we can’t keep making the women to whom this happens responsible. They are the ones we have got to speak. Why?” she told Emily Maitlis.

She railed against the “conspiracy of silence” and described Weinstein as “the top of a very particular iceberg” in “a system of harassment and belittling and bullying and interference” and warned that there were many more like him in Hollywood.

Asked if she was a friend of Weinstein, who was credited with transforming the British film industry in the 1990s, she replied emphatically: “No, and that is the understatement of the century.”

She spoke hours after British actor Sophie Dix went public with allegations of a sexual assault involving masturbation, which she said “was the most damaging thing” to have happened in her life.

Thompson said she was unaware of the specific incidents but was not surprised. She said she only had business dealings with Weinstein and clashed with him over Nanny McPhee when Miramax owned the film.

BBC Newsnight ✔@BBCNewsnight
“I spent my twenties trying to get old men’s tongues out of my mouth” – Emma Thompson on being a woman in Hollywood
11:45 AM - Oct 12, 2017


“I think there are probably about a million missed opportunities to call this man out on his disgusting behaviour,” Thompson said.

“I don’t think you can describe him as a sex addict, he’s a predator. That’s different. He’s at the top of, as it were the ladder of, a system of harassment and belittlement and bullying and interference. This has been part of our world, women’s world, since time immemorial.


“So what we need to start talking about is the crisis in masculinity, the crisis of extreme masculinity which is this sort of behaviour.”

Asked if she thought producers, directors or agents were pushing women into Weinstein’s professional path while knowing of his behaviour, she responded: “Isn’t it the same story as Jimmy Savile? If someone’s powerful, you can say, as the nurses used to do in those hospitals, ‘Be careful, be careful, pretend you’re asleep.’ So some of the agents may have said, ‘Look he’s a little bit … He’s a little bit oily, he’s a little bit this. Don’t worry. Again, he might pester you a bit. But, you know, go in’,” she said.

She said every girl or woman had stories of boys or men trying to stick tongues down their throats, lunge at them in lifts or feel them up on public transport and it was time for men and women to speak up.

“I mean, I’ve just said I’ve I spent my 20s trying to get old men’s tongues out of my mouth, you know, because they just thought, ‘Well she’s up for it.’ So I would imagine that that happens really very regularly, and so perhaps this is a moment when we can say to men and women: ‘Open your eyes and open your mouths and say something’.”

She said there were many like Weinstein in Hollywood. “Does it only count if you have done it to loads and loads of women, or does it count if you have done it to one woman, once. I think the latter.”

She recalled how she threatened to walk out of a film after another, unnamed producer told her co-star to go on a diet to appear in Brideshead Revisited.

“I will always speak up because I am bolshy and I will take someone’s head off if I see anything like that,” said Thompson.

On Tuesday, Weinstein was accused of rape by three women – claims that the producer says he unequivocally denies.

On Thursday evening, singer and model Myleene Klass became the latest woman to speak out about Weinstein, telling the Sun he offered her a “sex contract” at a meeting in Cannes.
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Re: 'Beautiful Girls' Scribe Scott Rosenberg On a Complicate

Postby admin » Tue Oct 31, 2017 11:34 pm

Harvey Weinstein: English actor says alleged sexual assault ruined film career
Sophie Dix says encounter at the Savoy hotel when she was 22 was ‘the single most damaging thing that’s happened in my life’

by Lisa O'Carroll
theguardian.com
October 13, 2017

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Sophie Dix said, once she was in the hotel room, ‘all the alarm bells started ringing’. Photograph: Graeme Robertson for the Guardian

An English actor who was on the brink of a career in the British film industry in the 1990s has told how her trajectory was “massively cut down” after an alleged sexual assault by Harvey Weinstein in a London hotel.

Sophie Dix claimed the Hollywood mogul performed an unwelcome sexual act in her presence after she was invited up his room at the Savoy hotel “to watch some rushes” – a film production term for unprocessed footage from a day’s filming.

She now says that what happened next was “the single most damaging thing that’s happened in my life”.

Dix had been cast in a new film with Colin Firth in 1990. Having been excited about her big break, she says that she accepted Weinstein’s invitation “naively”.

Once in the hotel room, “all the alarm bells starting ringing” and “within a heartbeat” she found herself pushed on the bed with him “tugging at her clothes”.

The young actor, who was 22 at the time, says that she managed to bolt to the bathroom and after some time in hiding opted to make an escape. She opened the door and found him facing her “standing there masturbating”.

The incident left her traumatised and depressed. She “took to the bed for six months” and concluded that the movies were not for her. “I decided if this what being an actress is like, I don’t want it,” she said.


Dix, now 48 and a screenwriter, had thought she was on verge of a film career after appearing alongside Colin Firth and Donald Pleasance in a film called The Hour of the Pig in the UK and The Advocate in the USA. When Weinstein invited her to dinner at Joe Allen, an American restaurant in Covent Garden frequented by people in the entertainment business, she said she “felt flattered”.

She had met Weinstein socially with colleagues in the industry, but was nervous about the one-to-one because he was one of the most powerful men in Hollywood.

“Maybe I went to talk about the film, maybe I went because it was a dinner in Joe Allen with someone from Hollywood. The point was, I had met him before I was doing a film with him. It was an exciting time of my life. I was open and trusting and I had never met a predator; I had never considered a predator,” she said.

“He made sure the wine was flowing,” she recalls. He told her he was “struggling with scenes” in another film and explained she might be able to help if she came to his room to watch the rushes. “I went trustingly and naively perhaps ... I suppose I just took it at face value,” she said.

“As soon as I was in there, I realised it was a terrible mistake. I got to the hotel room, I remember talk of a massage and I thought that was pretty gross. I think he showed me his big back and I found that pretty horrid.

“Then before I knew it, he started trying to pull my clothes off and pin me down and I just kept saying, ‘No, no, no.’ But he was really forceful. I remember him pulling at my trousers and stuff and looming over me and I just sort of – I am a big, strong girl and I bolted … ran for the bathroom and locked the door.”

“I was in there for a while, I think. He went very quiet. After a while I remember opening the door and seeing him just there facing the door, masturbating, so I quickly closed the door again and locked it. Then when I heard room service come to the door, I just ran,” she said.


Dix told her family, friends and colleagues about the incident at the time, but has decided 26 years later to tell the story more widely because for the first time she feels it will make a difference.

“I was very, very vocal about it at the time. I didn’t want to own it. I wanted people to take it away from me. But I was met with a wall of silence. People who were involved in the film were great, my friends and my family were amazing and very compassionate, but people in the industry didn’t want to know about it, they didn’t want to hear.

She considered going to police and discussed the incident with other women, but they felt they would be “trashed” and lose their careers.

She also vowed never to see Weinstein again, but months later she said she got what she felt was a phone call from him telling her to “stop talking”. Then over Christmas that year, when her family were away to visit her brother in Australia, Weinstein called again.

She believes it was Christmas Day, but cannot be certain. She recalls she had been at friends’ for dinner and was back at her home in north London when the phone rang. It was a call that she said terrified her.

“’This is Harvey. How are you?’ I was paralysed. There was no one in the house, I remember … and then he said: ‘It’s a new year, and I’ve decided to turn over a new leaf and I’m going to start with you, and I’m going to say I’m sorry and is there anything I can do for you?’

“I remember those were his exact words. I don’t know if he meant money. I didn’t think what he meant at the time. I knew very definitely I was speaking to a tape-recorded situation and I said, ‘No, thank you,’” she said. “It was awful. I felt frightened. I was alone in the house. It was like further abuse, further trauma.”


Dix went on to have roles in television series such as ITV’s Soldier Soldier, but she never got another movie role and she now concentrates on her work as a screenwriter.

“I had done some TV and stuff before, that but this was my big movie break. I still had a decent acting career, but it was all in TV. I never really had a film career. I think my film career was massively cut short.

She hopes speaking out could help change what she describes as a “misogynist” and “antiquated” industry where “men hitting on women” in the workplace is accepted. “I told a lot of people who I thought might be capable of action, and I realised their hands were tied and they weren’t willing to help me in the way I hoped, so I just buried it.

“You think you go into the film business because you think it is this free-thinking, liberal-minded industry, but actually it could not be more opposite. It is as antiquated, as sexist and rigged as they come.

“What I’m interested in talking about is the aftermath of a trauma like that. I’ve had friends call this week after the New York Times pieces came out, some who are now really famous, who knew about it at the time, and they say: ‘This was the moment it changed for you.’

“It was massively damaging. It’s the single most damaging thing that’s happened in my life.”

She said she buried her memories of the incident until, this week, dozens of actors from Angeline Jolie and Gwyneth Paltrow to Cara Delevingne stepped forward with allegations of unwelcome sexual overtures and assault. London and New York police have also said they have opened unspecified investigations into Weinstein.

Weinstein said he realised his behaviour with colleagues “has caused a lot of pain and I sincerely apologise for it” when the first allegations of sexual misconduct emerged a week ago.

He has subsequently “unequivocally denied” any allegations of non-consensual sex, and a spokeswoman has said that he never retaliated against women who refused his sexual advances.

“Mr Weinstein obviously can’t speak to anonymous allegations, but with respect to any women who have made allegations on the record, Mr Weinstein believes that all of these relationships were consensual.”
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Re: 'Beautiful Girls' Scribe Scott Rosenberg On a Complicate

Postby admin » Tue Oct 31, 2017 11:36 pm

'I had to defend myself': the night Harvey Weinstein jumped on me
by Léa Seydoux
theguardian.com
October 11, 2017

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‘He was using his power to get sex.’ Photograph: Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

I meet men like Harvey Weinstein all the time. I have starred in many films over the last 10 years and have been lucky enough to win awards at festivals like Cannes. Cinema is my life. And I know all of the ways in which the film industry treats women with contempt.

When I first met Harvey Weinstein, it didn’t take me long to figure him out. We were at a fashion show. He was charming, funny, smart – but very domineering. He wanted to meet me for drinks and insisted we had to make an appointment that very night. This was never going to be about work. He had other intentions – I could see that very clearly.

We met in the lobby of his hotel. His assistant, a young woman, was there. All throughout the evening, he flirted and stared at me as if I was a piece of meat. He acted as if he were considering me for a role. But I knew that was bullshit. I knew it, because I could see it in his eyes. He had a lecherous look. He was using his power to get sex.

He invited me to come to his hotel room for a drink. We went up together. It was hard to say no because he’s so powerful. All the girls are scared of him. Soon, his assistant left and it was just the two of us. That’s the moment where he started losing control.

We were talking on the sofa when he suddenly jumped on me and tried to kiss me. I had to defend myself. He’s big and fat, so I had to be forceful to resist him. I left his room, thoroughly disgusted.
I wasn’t afraid of him, though. Because I knew what kind of man he was all along.

Since that night in his hotel room, I’ve seen him on many other occasions. We are in the same industry, so it’s impossible to avoid him. I’ve seen how he operates: the way he looks for an opening. The way he tests women to see what he can get away with.

He also doesn’t take no for an answer. I once went with him to a restaurant and when he couldn’t get a table he got angry and said: “Do you know who I am? I am Harvey Weinstein.” That’s the kind of man he is.


I’ve been at dinners with him where he’s bragged openly about Hollywood actresses he has had sex with. He’s also said misogynistic things to me over the years. “You’d be better if you lost weight,” he said. That comment shocked me.

One night, I saw him in London for the Baftas. He was hitting on a young woman. Another time, at the Met Life ball, I saw him trying to convince a young woman to sleep with him. Everyone could see what he was doing.

That’s the most disgusting thing. Everyone knew what Harvey was up to and no one did anything. It’s unbelievable that he’s been able to act like this for decades and still keep his career. That’s only possible because he has a huge amount of power.


In this industry, there are directors who abuse their position. They are very influential, that’s how they can do that. With Harvey, it was physical. With others, it’s just words. Sometimes, it feels like you have to be very strong to be a woman in the film industry. It’s very common to encounter these kinds of men.

The first time a director made an inappropriate comment to me, I was in my mid-20s. He was a director I really liked and respected. We were alone and he said to me: “I wish I could have sex with you, I wish I could fuck you.”


He said it in a way that was half joking and half serious. I was very angry. I was trying to do my job and he made me very uncomfortable. He has slept with all of the actresses he filmed.

Another director I worked with would film very long sex scenes that lasted days. He kept watching us, replaying the scenes over and over again in a kind of stupor. It was very gross.

Yet another director tried to kiss me. Like Weinstein, I had to physically push him away, too. He acted like a crazy man, deranged by the fact that I didn’t want to have sex with him.

If you’re a woman working in the film industry, you have to fight because it is a very misogynistic world. Why else are salaries so unequal? Why do men earn more than women? There is no reason for it to be that way.


Hollywood is incredibly demanding on women. Think about the beauty diktats. All of the actresses have botox at 30. They have to be perfect. This is an image of women that is bizarre – and one that ends up controlling women.

This industry is based on desirable actresses. You have to be desirable and loved. But not all desires have to be fulfilled, even though men in the industry have an expectation that theirs should be. I think – and hope – that we might finally see a change. Only truth and justice can bring us forward.

Léa Seydoux is a French actor. She was awarded the Palme d’Or at the Cannes film festival for her film Blue Is the Warmest Colour
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Re: 'Beautiful Girls' Scribe Scott Rosenberg On a Complicate

Postby admin » Wed Nov 01, 2017 5:57 am

Hollywood men silent over Weinstein allegations as women speak out: When the Guardian contacted 20 high-profile actors and directors who have worked with the producer, many failed to respond
Harvey Weinstein speaks in New York earlier this year.

by Sam Levin and Julia Carrie Wong in San Francisco
10 October 2017 20.13 EDT
First published on Monday 9 October 2017 20.52 EDT

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Meryl Streep, Judi Dench, Kate Winslet and dozens of other women in Hollywood have condemned the producer Harvey Weinstein amid a growing number of sexual harassment allegations. Most high-profile men in the industry, however, have remained silent.

The Guardian contacted more than 20 male actors and directors who have worked with the movie mogul over the years, some of whom have projects with Weinstein. All declined to comment or did not respond to inquiries about the accusations that the producer sexually harassed women over a period of nearly three decades. Weinstein allegedly invited vulnerable women to hotel rooms for business reasons and then greeted them in the nude or asked them to massage him or watch him shower, according to a New York Times report.

The list of industry figures thus far remaining silent includes a number of male directors, such as the Oscar-nominated Quentin Tarantino (Pulp Fiction, Kill Bill, Inglourious Basterds, the Hateful Eight) and David O Russell (Silver Linings Playbook, The Fighter, Flirting With Disaster), who have both made numerous movies with Weinstein.

The liberal film-maker Michael Moore, currently working with Weinstein on a documentary about Donald Trump, also did not respond to a request for comment.

To some, the glaring silence from the men of Hollywood reflects a broader culture of misogyny in the entertainment business, boosted by enablers who looked the other way or ignored the rumors, allowing the Weinstein accusations to remain an “open secret” for years.

“Why are they being silent? What do they have to hide?” the New Zealand model Zoë Brock said in an interview Monday, two days after she published her own account of alleged harassment by Weinstein. “I’d love to hear from some of those guys. They are all men I admire and look up to as artists. They’re all men with daughters. It’s horrifying.”


The accusations first came to light last week in the New York Times report, which included on-the-record testimony from the actor Ashley Judd and others who said they had been victimized by Weinstein. Over the years, the producer reached settlements with at least eight women, including actors and assistants, the paper reported.

Weinstein, who was fired from his company on Sunday, has apologized for the “pain” he has caused, but he and his attorneys have also said he denies “many” of the allegations, saying the piece was “saturated with false and defamatory statements” and relied “on mostly hearsay accounts”.

"My brother Harvey is obviously a very sick man. I've urged him to seek immediate professional help because he is in dire need of it. His remorse and apologies to the victims of his abuse are hollow. He said he would go away for help and has yet to do so."

Bob goes on ... "He has proven himself to be a world class liar and now rather than seeking help he is looking to blame others. His assertion is categorically untrue from A to Z. I pray he gets the help that he needs and I believe that it is him behind all of these stories to distract from his own failure to get help."

-- Harvey Weinstein Says Brother Bob Responsible for His Demise, tmz.com


Harvey Weinstein seems to have flunked out of sex rehab after about a week.

-- O’Reilly, "Shitty Media Men," and the Harassment Double Standard: In the past, the sexual-harasser perps got their jobs back while their female victims lost their careers. Will this time be different?, by Sarah Ellison


The Guardian, which has not independently confirmed the accounts in the New York Times, published an interview Monday with actor Romola Garai, who alleged that Weinstein greeted her wearing only a dressing gown when she was 18.

Shortly after the New York Times story went viral last week, many prominent women in Hollywood lent their voices in support of the accusers. Patricia Arquette, Amber Tamblyn, Olivia Munn, Lena Dunham, Brie Larson, Constance Wu, Rosie O’Donnell, America Ferrera, Jessica Chastain and others tweeted soon after it published.

Days later and under some pressure to comment, Streep and Dench also weighed in, both strongly condemning the alleged offenses and claiming they had no prior knowledge of the accusations. Winslet also released a statement saying Weinstein had “behaved in reprehensible and disgusting ways”. She also acknowledged that there had been whisperings over the years: “I had hoped that these kind of stories were just made-up rumours, maybe we have all been naive. And it makes me so angry.”

No woman should be allowed to be "naive" to another woman's suffering.

-- by Anonymous


The actors Seth Rogen and Mark Ruffalo have spoken up, but most male celebrities with ties to Weinstein have chosen not to comment, even after Weinstein was ousted from his own company.

The Guardian contacted representatives of actors who have starred in Weinstein films, including Ben Affleck, Matt Damon, Colin Firth, Bradley Cooper, Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio, Daniel Day-Lewis, Russell Crowe, George Clooney and Ewan McGregor, along with the directors Tarantino, Russell, Ryan Coogler, Tom Hooper, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Michael Moore, Rob Marshall, Robert Pulcini, Garth Davis, Doug McGrath, John Madden, Simon Curtis, Kevin Williamson, Martin Scorsese, John Hillcoat and John Wells.

None initially commented, despite the fact that many have been vocal about gender equality in the industry and other social justice causes. Many have directly criticized Donald Trump amid similar accusations of sexual misconduct.
On Tuesday, several released statements or responded to the Guardian.

Clooney later told the Daily Beast the alleged acts of sexual misconduct carried out by the film producer were “indefensible”. Miranda tweeted in response to this article: “I’m as appalled and repulsed by the Weinstein news as anyone with a beating heart. And forever in awe of the bravery of those who spoke out.”

Affleck also released a statement Tuesday, saying: “I am saddened and angry that a man who I worked with used his position of power to intimidate, sexually harass and manipulate many women over decades.”

Firth responded to the Guardian on Tuesday, saying in a statement that Weinstein “was a powerful and frightening man to stand up to”, adding: “It must have been terrifying for these women to step up and call him out. And horrifying to be subjected to that kind of harassment. I applaud their courage”.

Damon and Crowe were caught up in the scandal this week when a former New York Times reporter alleged that when she was investigating Weinstein in 2004, the two actors called her to vouch for a key Weinstein associate, apparently in an effort to discourage her from moving forward with the piece.
Representatives for both actors did not respond to inquiries about the allegations from the journalist Sharon Waxman.

Damon on Tuesday defended his “one minute” call to the reporter in 2004, telling Deadline he was vouching for the Weinstein associate, with whom he had “perfectly professional experiences”, and that he had not been aware of harassment allegations and had not been trying to kill the story.

Pulcini, a writer and director, emailed a statement to the Guardian after publication of this story, saying: “I have such admiration for the women who have spoken up. What bravery. There should be zero tolerance EVERYWHERE for this kind of horrifying behavior. I’m honored to offer them a male director’s voice of total support, and appreciate you providing me a forum to do so.”

Coogler, whose first feature film was produced by Weinstein, said in an email Tuesday that he had “no knowledge of this predatory behavior”, but that he saluted the “brave women who came forward”.

“As men we sit in positions of privilege. It is our responsibility to leverage our position, and be allies to the women in our industry. We need to do everything we can to make sure violations like these don’t continue to happen. The first step is to listen.”

DiCaprio published a short statement late Tuesday night that did not name Weinstein but said: “There is no excuse for sexual harassment or sexual assault – no matter who you are and no matter what profession.”

Madden later released a statement to the Guardian, saying the Weinstein revelations “deserve total condemnation”, adding: “For those of us who have worked with him, they are shaming and unforgivable. I applaud the women who have been brave enough to share their testimony of profoundly damaging and deeply abusive experiences.”

Migdia Chinea, a film-maker and screenwriter, said it was “outrageous” that so few men had been willing to speak up.

“Many of these guys are very well known in liberal circles and they support a very progressive approach to equality and women,” she said. “Here’s an opportunity for these guys to really speak about this issue. All of these powerful men should come forward and denounce sexual harassment.”

Rose McGowan, one of the most prominent Weinstein accusers, has called for the entire board of men in Weinstein’s company to resign and tweeted that men have remained silent because “they are weak and scared”.

Brock said she would like to see more men publicly admitting to their misconduct following the Weinstein news. “Wouldn’t it be nice if people had the courage and the gall to say, ‘Hey, I’ve done this, too. I need help’?”

Laura Finley, a Barry University professor and author of Domestic Abuse and Sexual Assault in Popular Culture, said it can make a huge difference when men publicly support women who have come forward.

“We need men’s voices even more than women’s voices,” she said. “Men can reach men in ways that women unfortunately still can’t.”

Before he was fired, Weinstein reportedly sent an email to high-level executives at studios, networks and talent agencies asking them to write statements of support.

“I am desperate for your help,” he wrote, according to the Hollywood Reporter. “Do not let me be fired. If the industry supports me, that is all I need.”

If you have stories to share about Weinstein or sexual misconduct in Hollywood, contact sam.levin@theguardian.com
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